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Archives for : Now I Know It ALL

The OutRamp Guide to Science and Technology: Episode #10 – March 20, 2014

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Don’t Miss These Links:

  1. Stephen Hawking Finally Won One of His Famous Bets
  2. New “Chicken From Hell” Dinosaur Discovered
  3. The Germans Have Figured Out How to 3-D Print Cars

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The OutRamp Guide to Urban Life: Episode #4 – March 19, 2014

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  1. China’s Ambitious Plan to Move 100 Million People From Farms to Cities
  2. Redesigning A Less Wasteful New York City, With Giant Trash-Composting Parks
  3. Should People Be Allowed to Drink and “Drive” Self-Driving Cars?

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The OutRamp Guide to History and Prehistory: Episode #6 – March 19, 2014

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  1. How Elephant Armies Built the Ancient World
  2. Video: Watch as 1000 years of European borders change
  3. The Whimsical Fascists of Wes Anderson’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

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The OutRamp Guide to Science and Technology: Episode #9 – March 19, 2014

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Don’t Miss These Links:

  1. Science Deniers Are Freaking Out About “Cosmos”
  2. Now You Can Make Your Own Internet-Connected Gadgets, No Engineering Skills Required
  3. Human Appearance: How Will Technology Affect the Way We Look in 100,000 Years?

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The OutRamp Guide to Space: Episode #6 – March 18, 2014

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Don’t Miss These Links:

  1. Reality series about colonizing Mars might actually get us to the red planet
  2. Why the Big Bang Discovery Is Even More Important Than You Think
  3. Who Was Carl Sagan? The famed scientist, and celebrity, had a lot more going on than just hosting a television series.

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The OutRamp Guide to Sustainability: Episode #5 – March 15, 2014

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Don’t Miss These Links:

  1. The Price Of Ignoring Climate Change Is Far Higher Than We Think
  2. Twice As Many Californians Are Walking, Biking, or Taking Mass Transit
  3. A Quick Guide to Sounding Smart When You Talk About Energy

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The OutRamp Guide to Urban Life: Episode #3 – March 15, 2014

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Don’t Miss These Links:

  1. Paris’s Smog Has Gotten So Bad, It’s Making Public Transportation Free
  2. Why Andres Duany Is So Focused on Making ‘Lean Urbanism’ a Thing
  3. Dear America, Please Fix Your Crappy Infrastructure

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The OutRamp Guide to Science and Technology: Episode #8 – March 15, 2014

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Don’t Miss These Links:

  1. US Government Is Finally Giving Up Control of the Internet
  2. Dust, the Ledger of Past Existence
  3. Neil deGrasse Tyson on Cosmos, How Science Got Cool, and Why He Doesn’t Debate Deniers

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The OutRamp Guide to History and Prehistory: Episode #5

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  1. A sunken WWII-era Japanese ‘mega sub’ has been found near Hawaii: George Dvorsky at io9 has a good summary and some awesome photos.

    Researchers diving off the coast of Hawaii have found a sunken 400-foot (122 meter) “Sen-Toku” class submarine. One of the largest pre-nuclear subs ever built, the “mega sub” was torpedoed by the U.S. shortly after the Second World War to prevent the Soviet Union from getting their hands on the super-advanced technology.

    Longer than a football field, and only one of three ever built, the I-400 disappeared from the radar (so to speak) in 1946. It has been missing ever since.

  2. Has a poor translation ever caused a war or other serious crisis? I love AskHistorians on reddit; you never know what topics are going to come up, and for some reason, they’re almost always interesting.

    Intentional poor translation has, actually.

    The Treaty of Wuhale from 1889 between Italy and Ethiopia contained the phrase “the Emperor can use the Italian foreign office in his relations with other powers” in the Amharic version, and “the Emperor must use the Italian foreign office in his relations with other powers”, effectively making Ethiopia an Italian client and protectorate.

  3. Rock Piles, Graves, and Ice Caves Are Historic Monuments in Antarctica: Alissa Walker at Gizmodo covers something I never really thought about.

    There are 85 sites currently dubbed a Historic Site or Monument (HSM) based on their importance to exploration, science, or “feats of endurance” (which sounds like an episode of Double Dare). But unlike other monuments that have been denoted and approved by a city, state, or national government, these sites are landmarked by the Antarctic Treaty System, a set of international agreements that govern and protect the continent.

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The OutRamp Guide to Science and Technology: Episode #7

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Ah, science. Depressing. Oh, and wondrous, too, I guess.

Don’t Miss These Links:

  1. Chemists discover a greenhouse gas that’s 7,100 times worse than CO2George Dvorsky at io9 gives us something new from the “it gets better” department.

    Perfluorotributylamine, which has been in use by the electrical industry since the mid-2oth century, is the most radiatively efficient chemical known to science — a measure of how effectively a molecule can influence climate. The value of radiative efficiency is multiplied by its atmospheric concentration to determine total climate impact.

    The industrial chemical is used in various electrical equipment, such as transistors and capacitors. The researchers aren’t sure how widespread its use is today.

  2. Facebook’s ‘Deep Learning’ Guru Reveals the Future of AICade Metz at Wired helps us find out what’s coming. Probably more event invitations I don’t fully understand.

    With deep learning, Facebook could automatically identify faces in the photographs you upload, automatically tag them with the right names, and instantly share them with friends and family who might enjoy them too. Using similar techniques to analyze your daily activity on the site, it could automatically show you more stuff you wanna see.

    In some ways, Facebook and AI is a rather creepy combination. Deep learning provides a more effective means of analyzing your most personal of habits. “What Facebook can do with deep learning is unlimited,” says Abdel-rahman Mohamed, who worked on similar AI research at the University of Toronto. “Every day, Facebook is collecting the network of relationships between people. It’s getting your activity over the course of the day. It knows how you vote — Democrat or Republican. It knows what products you buy.”

  3. Outbreak! Watch How Quickly An Epidemic Would Spread Across The World: Ho! Ho! Ho! Merry Apocalypse! Thanks in part to Sydney Brownstone at Co.Exist.

    In March of 2009, the Mexican government confirmed it: A four-year-old boy in eastern Mexico’s La Gloria village had swine flu, or H1N1. Sixty percent of the village had reported an unknown respiratory illness back in February, and since, it looked like the virus had jumped. A flu case later confirmed to be H1N1 popped up in California. Then, it spanned an ocean. By late April, H1N1 had been reported in Spain, Israel, New Zealand, Austria, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Switzerland.

    Within an increasingly globalized and mobile world, the spread of contagion doesn’t work how it used to. But by taking these factors into account, theoretical physicist Dirk Brockmann and his colleagues have a radical new model that could predict the arrival times of the next global pandemic. The model relies on something called “effective distance,” and it destroys a centuries-old way of thinking about maps.

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